Paintings done on R/V FALKOR as Artist-at-Sea, July-August 2021

BATHYMETRY SHOWING SLOPE OF HANCOCK RIDGE_601 METERS; Gouache on Stonehenge Paper, 8 x 10", 2021BATHYMETRY SHOWING SLOPE OF HANCOCK RIDGE_601 METERS

Gouache on Stonehenge Paper, 8 x 10", 2021

Because of the increasing interest worldwide in mining the deep ocean, scientific exploration of formerly inaccessible areas where desirable minerals occur has become even more critical. A primary objective of BIODIVERSE BORDERLANDS, Schmidt Ocean Institute’s cruise to study the mineral-rich continental shelf adjacent to Southern California, was to locate and sample phosphorite and ferromanganese, minerals which form on steep deep ocean slopes. This painting shows a map highlighting elevation, which was created by Falkor’s advanced bathymetric technology for our first dive of the cruise to Hancock Ridge. Similar to the way an ultrasound works, this technology sends multi-beam sonar sound pulses over a swath of the seabed which then return to the ship. Each depth has an associated color: purple is flattest and red is steepest.

Gouache on Stonehenge paper, 8 x 10″, 2021

CTENPHORE thallasocalyce AT SAN JUAN SEAMOUNT, Gouache on Stonehenge paper, 10 x 8", 2021CTENPHORE thallasocalyce AT SAN JUAN SEAMOUNT

Gouache on Stonehenge paper, 10 x 8", 2021

This ethereal invertebrate moves through the layers of the world’s oceans by using its cilia to swim. Although it is commonly known as Comb Jelly, it is actually not related to jellyfish. Approximately 200 species of Ctenophore have been identified, but a new research methodology called Environmental DNA Sampling may permit the identification of as many as 800 of these fragile organisms.
Most are bioluminescent, often translucent, shimmering or iridescent.
This beautiful Ctenophore appears as a starry galaxy floating in a vast space. We observed it via FALKOR’S SuBastian ROV at San Juan Sea Mount, depth of 1450 meters (4757 feet, nearly one mile.)

Gouache on Arches paper, 8 x 10″, 2021

RED JELLYFISH poralia rufescens, Gouache on Arches paper, 9 x 12", 2021RED JELLYFISH poralia rufescens

Gouache on Arches paper, 9 x 12", 2021

The genus Poralia contains as yet only a single species, Poralia rufescens. It lives in the pelagic zone of the deep ocean. In this case, it was seen during SuBastian’s descent to San Juan Sea Mount (1450 meters.) Poralia rufescens has around 30 tentacles and a 9 cm bell; it moves by pulsing its body. The distinctive glowing plummy-orange color of this species (which, along with its translucency is what drew me to paint it) helps camouflage it from predators, because red light disappears with depth. At the deeper layers of the water column, the elusive jellyfish seems to vanish from view.

Gouache on Stonehenge paper, 9 x 12″, 2021

 

September 2021. I was invited to be Artist At Sea🧜🏼‍♀️🎨

September 2021.
I was invited to be Artist At Sea in July and August on an oceanographic research vessel, R/V FALKOR, with a team of scientists from Scripps Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of the cruise was to explore and conduct a baseline survey of the borderlands of the continental crust off the coast of California. To watch a short video about our cruise and read my blogs, “Who Drinks the Water of Life?” and “Painting Other Worlds” please visit:

Biodiverse Borderlands Cruise

R/V FALKOR, an oceanographic research vessel operated by Schmidt Ocean Institute. 272 feet in length; crew of 23 plus Science Team (8 members from 3 institutions), Artist At Sea (me) and media specialist (Brady Lawrence).R/V FALKOR, an oceanographic research vessel operated by Schmidt Ocean Institute

272 feet in length; crew of 23 plus Science Team (8 members from 3 institutions), Artist At Sea (me) and media specialist (Brady Lawrence).

The Science Team plus Artist At Sea (me, at far right) from The Biodiverse Borderlands Cruise July 25-August 6, 2021, aboard R/V FALKOR, operated by Schmidt Ocean Institute. Photo credit Brady Lawrence. We are standing on the aft deck in from of ROV SuBastian.The Science Team plus Artist At Sea (me, at far right) from The Biodiverse Borderlands Cruise July 25-August 6, 2021, aboard R/V FALKOR, operated by Schmidt Ocean Institute. Behind us, ROV SuBastian.    The poster is a challenge to the international community of scientists to devote the next decade to critical ocean research. Photo credit Brady Lawrence.

We are standing on the aft deck in from of ROV SuBastian.

Two Sea Anemones Living on a Dead Glass Sponge Stalk—near the Rosebud WhaleFall

TWO ANEMONES ON A DEAD GLASS SPONGE STALK, NEAR THE ROSEBUD WHALE FALL

Detail, ROSEBUD WHALE FALL, Oil on canvas on panel, 27 x 40 ¼", 2021

Sea Anemone Liponema brevicornis (?) (Phylum Cnidaria) is a predatory invertebrate animal. It is related to coral, jellyfish and Hydra.

It is thought that some Glass Sponges living on the seabed were killed at the time Rosebud was sunk off the coast of Point Loma, San Diego. The stalk or spicule (made of glass and thus not alive) remained. These anemones are using the glass stalk to get off the ocean floor to a higher position where they can get more food in the current. (See illustration below of Glass Sponge on its stalk/spicule—a double helix of glass strands.)

Online Art Exhibition at Lunar and Planetary Laboratory

I have four paintings currently on view in this online show, which will be available to view through October 2020. This juried exhibition is sponsored by The University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in celebration of the beauty and elegance of planetary science. You can see two of my paintings in the Fine Arts selection, and two in the Data Art category. To view this show go to www.lpl.arizona.edu/art. Thank you!

http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/art

Lithodes couesi (Scarlett King Crab)

Lithodes couesi "<emis one of the species to be found on the Rosebud Whale Fall, located off the coast of Point Loma in San Diego at a depth of 2765 feet (843 meters). “Rosebud,” a 60 foot female fin whale weighing 23 tons, had washed up on the beach after being struck and killed by a ship. In order to study what would happen to the carcass as it lay on the ocean floor (the first whale fall was discovered by a Navy bathyscaphe only in 1977 ), Greg Rouse of Scripps Institution of Oceanography quickly mobilized to sink it in a location in which the natural processes could be observed. Seven tons of chain and shackles (visible in the upper right corner of this detail) were used to sink the fallen giant, in November 2011, twelve miles offshore. Since then, there have been at least six visits by R.O.V.s (Remotely Operated Vehicles) to track the colonization and the slow disintegration of the Rosebud skeleton, an ecosystem unto itself, lying one and a half miles beneath the surface of the ocean.

My painting, ROSEBUD WHALE FALL, visually describes some of the notable creatures which have been discovered at this deep ocean site.

 

Detail, ROSEBUD WHALE FALL, Oil on canvas mounted on panel, 27 x 40″

© Tanya Young 2020.

Joggins Drawing Published

My drawing, JOGGINS (Nova Scotia) CARBONIFEROUS PERIOD was published in Brains Through Time, A Natural History of Vertebrates by Georg F. Striedter and R. Glenn Northcutt, Oxford University Press, 2020.

CARBONIFEROUS PERIOD in BRAINS THROUGH TIME, Graphite and charcoal on Coquille paper, ©Tanya_Young2018JOGGINS CARBONIFEROUS PERIOD in BRAINS THROUGH TIME

Graphite and charcoal on Coquille paper, ©Tanya_Young2018

Giant Siphonophore praya

Siphonophore looks like one gigantic animal—130 feet or more, longer than a blue whale—but is actually “many thousands of individuals which form an entity on a higher level.” (Stefan Siebert). Each individual “zooid” (clone) has its own specialized function for the survival of the colony, i.e. capturing prey, navigation, reproduction. Most zooids are so specialized, they can’t survive on their own. Because they are clones, all the zooids are genetically identical. Siphonophore lives in the pelagic zone, the water column of the open ocean.

Siphonophore prayaDETAIL, ROSEBUD WHALE FALL

Oil on canvas on panel, ©Tanya Young 2020.

More Rosebud Whale Fall (in Progress)

October, 2019
Two other, very beautiful, species from ROSEBUD WHALE FALL (for Scripps Oceanography.)
On the vignette: the iridescent scaleworm genus mallicacephala living on the skin of its host, the purple sea cucumber Pannychia.
The “gold spheres” surrounding the scaleworm in the vignette are the retracted purple tube feet of the Pannychia.
The Pannychia is called out on the right. You can see the little worm on the host.
Pannychia can be up to two feet in length.
A detail of the iridescent scaleworm, genus mallicacephala. There
are dozens of layers of transparency in this image; it took me for-friggin’-ever to paint it!

Newest ROSEBUD Species

The newest specimen from my ROSEBUD painting for Greg Rouse of SIO.
This is a Glass Sponge (porifera hyalonema) found living on the ocean floor near the Rosebud Whale Fall. An Anemone has colonized on the spicule, i.e. the stalk—a double helix of glass strands. It is not yet known how the glass is produced by the sponge.
Oil paint on panel, 2018.

The newest specimen from my ROSEBUD painting for Greg Rouse of SIO.
This is a Glass Sponge (porifera) found living on the ocean floor near the Rosebud Whale Fall. An Anemone has colonized on the spicule, i.e. the stalk—a double helix of glass strands. It is not yet known how the glass is produced by the sponge.
Oil paint on panel, 2018.

The actual glass stalk, from the collection at UCSD/Scripps: Benthic Invertebrates. Thank you, Charlotte Seid Ph.D!The actual glass stalk, from the collection at UCSD/Scripps: Benthic Invertebrates. Thank you, Charlotte Seid Ph.D for lending it to me!

The actual glass stalk, from the collection at UCSD/Scripps: Benthic Invertebrates. Thank you, Charlotte Seid Ph.D!

 

JOGGINS CARBONIFEROUS SWAMP FROM 350 MILLION YEARS AGO

Here is a detail (see the full illustration on my Science Illustration page) of the JOGGINS (NOVA SCOTIA) CARBONIFEROUS SWAMP FROM 350 MILLION YEARS AGO. The little lizard on the Lepidodendron tree log is Hylonomus lyelli, the earliest lizard and first amniote and thus our and all mammals’ ancestor. This geologic period, the Pennsylvania, had 40% more oxygen than we have now, which made for some extra large insects. The dragonfly pictured (Meganeura) had a wingspan of one meter, and the roach below it was one foot long.

This illustration is for a book entitled Brains Through Time, A Natural History of Vertebrates to be published by Oxford University Press in February 2019. The authors are R. Glenn Northcutt from Scripps Oceanography and Georg Streidter from UC Irvine.

DETAIL, JOGGINS (NOVA SCOTIA) CARBONIFEROUS SWAMP FROM 350 MILLION YEARS AGO (PENNSYLVANIA PERIOD)DETAIL, JOGGINS (NOVA SCOTIA) CARBONIFEROUS SWAMP FROM 350 MILLION YEARS AGO (PENNSYLVANIA PERIOD)

Black Prismacolor, Graphite and Ink on Coquille Board.
This drawing will appear soon in Brains Through Time, A Natural History of Vertebrates by R. Glenn Northcutt (Scripps Oceanography) and Georg Striedter (UCIrvine)